Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Maine Maple Sap Soap


I have a special project that I have been working on and just about finished it up today. I wanted to try to produce a Maine Maple Sap Soap. I thought, why not? Sap is mostly water until it is boiled down into the sticky syrup, so it should work perfectly in my soap. Here I go...

A few weeks back I was talking to my dad and I asked him if he had any maple trees on his 60 acres. He did. I asked him to please tap them and collect some maple sap for me. So, he did. He gave me about a gallon of maple sap. I used this as water replacement in my soap making process. The natural sugar in the maple sap did turn the soap a bit tan, and it looks great. I added some sweet vanilla honey fragrance to it and stirred up a big batch. Looks good and smells great. How unique. Maine Maple Sap Soap. I can't wait for it to be ready to use.

3 comments:

sproutsandsweetpeas said...

That's so cool! Does the sap make the soap sticky? Does it smell at all like maple syrup too, or just the fragrance? That is such a great idea, & is really using the local resources. I can't wait to see it!

sheela said...

I recently came across your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I don't know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.

Sarah

http://www.craigslistpostingonline.info

Casco Bay Soap Co. said...

Thank you both for your interest and for visiting and commenting on my blog. I appreciate it.
The maple sap does not make the soap sticky, as it wasn't really sticky to start. Remember it takes 40 gallons of sap to make 1 gallon of syrup. You have to boil down and steam out all that excess water. It does have sugar in it and I had to take precautions when mixing it up, as the natural sugar has a funky reaction sometimes when making soap. But it all came out great. I fragrances it with a sweet honey/vanilla fragrance and smells great. It's a neat limited edition soap.